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Environment

The natural world—Creation—is a wonder that we are meant to enjoy and appreciate. We are both the beneficiaries of the bounties of nature and the stewards of the natural world. As our power to damage the earth’s ecology grows, our ability to benefit from Creation—and perhaps even human survival—depend upon the effectiveness of our stewardship.

Related Resources

In our second session of Reconstructing for Tomorrow, we were led in a discussion about the spiritual and tangible ways we can integrate ecological values into our Jewish lives.

Our Network for Network Builders discussion, led by Cyd Weissman, welcomed us into a world of thinkers and leaders guided by a "culture of generosity." By taking time to share success stories, open up challenging discussions, and provide mentorship, we learned about building a network of trust among colleagues near and far.

RRC/JRC signed onto a letter urging members of Congress to support HR-3671, "Off Fossil Fuels for a Better Future Act."

Environment

Letter from American Jewish groups in response to the announced withdrawal from the Paris climate accord

Environment, Tikkun Olam

This resolution on the environment was adopted by the Reconstructionist movement in the 1980s.

This symposium among eight Reconstructionist leaders explores the interface between environmental activism and Jewish spirituality. Originally published in Winter 2001/2002 issue of Reconstructionism Today, this discussion remains relevant and valuable. 

"Love of the Creator, and love of that which G!d has created, are finally one and the same," wrote Martin Buber.  Defending this divine creation in an era of climate change is a Jewish (and social, political, and moral) imperative.

In this interview, Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb reflects on the Jewish roots of his climate change activism. He also reflects on how his role at Congregation Adat Shalom has led him to appreciate the emotional resistance that can arise when confronting injustice.

In this interview, Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb reflects on the Jewish roots of his climate change activism. He also reflects on how his role at Congregation Adat Shalom has led him to appreciate the emotional resistance that can arise when confronting injustice.

In this resource guide, Rabbis Fred Dobb and Nathan Martin present a plethora of resources to help congregations become shomrei adamah - responsible guardians of the Earth. 

This document contains two study guides which use Jewish texts and sources to offer wisdom on global climate change.

Environment, Textual Sources

A short parable on being out and about in the world

Element of Jewish tradition see the world as inherently sacred. Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb mines these sources as a source for Jewish environmental ethics and theology.

Environment, Textual Sources
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