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Karpas | Dipping Vegetables in Salt Water

We eat greens of spring while we remember bitter tears.

Parsley sprig leaning against glass of salt water, with matzah in the background

 

Arise My Darling (Song of Songs 2:10-13)” performed by Shabbat Unplugged for A Night of Questions *  Song of Songs is traditionally read on Passover as a welcome to spring.

Arise My Darling (Song Of Songs 2:10-13) by Reconstructing Judaism

 

Here’s a suggested activity: Invite everyone at your seder to look for signs of spring on the seder table. How about outside, out the window or in the yard? What other symbols of spring can you think of?

 

Tomato on the Seder Plate by T’ruah: the Rabbinic Call for Human Rights
The Coalition of Immokalee Workers is a widely acclaimed organization of farmworkers who are working to end abusive conditions in Florida’s tomato fields, which have long created fertile ground for modern-day slavery. Their Campaign for Fair Food has brought about historic changes in the fields. Consider adding a tomato to your seder plate with their story in mind.

 


§ Curated and written by Rabbi Elyse Wechterman and Rabbi Maurice Harris. Sourced by Rabbi Michael Fessler, Tresa Grauer, Ph.D., Alison Houghton, Rabbi Maurice Harris, Jackie Land, Rabbi Alan LaPayover, Rabbi Vivie Mayer, Rabbi Isaac Saposnik, Rabbi Elyse Wechterman, Rabbi Micah Geurin Weiss, Cyd Weissman. Graphic by Rosa Cohen. Web development by Rabbi Michael Fessler.

* Music courtesy of Rabbi Micah Becker-Klein, Rabbi Myriam Klotz, Rabbi G. Rayzel Raphael, Juliet Spitzer, Rabbi Margot Stein and Rabbi Shawn Zevit. More of their music and the music of their bands, Shabbat Unplugged and Miraj, is available on SpotifyiTunes and CD Baby. Songs copyright ©Shabbat Unplugged and the Reconstructionist Press.