Learn how the Momentum Campaign is reconstructing Judaism → 

Home » Virtual Shabbat Box » Virtual Shabbat Box Archives: November 2023

Virtual Shabbat Box Archives: November 2023

November 24-25

Rabbi Haviva Ner-David, author and peace activist who lives in Israel’s Galilee region, shares the pain she feels as well as her unwavering commitment to peace. She reads a poem dedicated to Canadian-Israeli peace activist Vivian Silver, who was slain on October 7.

Person making a heart shape with their hands, backlit by the sun

At this time, when it may be hard to express gratitude, Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer, Ritualwell’s new director of virtual content and programs, offers intentions to share with your Thanksgiving Day guests. 

An empty tree-lined street with fall leaves in the foreground

Rabbi Isaac Saposnik reminds us of the importance of respect and empathy — and the dangers of absolutes — in engaging on social media, especially when it comes to the Israel-Hamas War.

Two people on the beach pointing towards a sunset

Rabbi Sandra Lawson writes that supporting transgender rights is “not just a secular or political stance but a deeply spiritual and Jewish one.”

transgender flag

November 17-18

Rabbi Deborah Waxman explores the stories of Genesis, and highlights some more contemporary thinkers, in a search for sources of empathy and resilience in the extreme uncertainty of the present.

A stone well in a field at sunrise

In this excerpt from Ritualwell’s weekly “Holding Each Other” gathering, Rabbi Janet Madden chants the Oseh Shalom and Mi Shebeirach prayers. Madden lovingly and soulfully expresses what so many yearn for: peace and healing.

Wildflowers in a field

Rabbi Amy Eilberg writes of peacebuilding, metta meditation and the importance of practicing lovingkindness during a time of war and heightened emotions.

Raindrops on a window against a gray background

Stressed? Confused, or Fearful? Try this breathing practice taught by Rabbi Sheila Peltz Weinberg.

Small white flowers against a gauzy white and tan background

November 10-11

At Ritualwell’s weekly “Holding Each Other” virtual event, Rabbi Alex Lazurus-Klein read two poems, one written during the Second Intifada and the other composed in the harrowing days following October 7. 

Close-up of someone holding an open book of poetry

Invoking the story of Noah’s Ark, Rabbi Jen Gubitz’s poem captures a torrent of thoughts, emotions and concerns stemming from the Israel-Hamas War.

Birds flying in the sky at dusk

With antisemitism alarmingly on the rise, Rachel Forth Pipitone’s poem tackles a disturbing expression within her own family.

Person with floral and leaf tattoo designs on their arms in black ink

Revisit this 2021 essay from Rabbi Deborah Waxman in which addresses rising global antisemitism and articulates a response that reaffirms Jewish life, practice and community.

Read: Beyond Antisemitism

November 3-4

Feeling uprooted by recent events? Rabbi Jessica Lott’s audio teaching can help to ground you. She notes that Jewish tradition constantly places one foot in the past, one foot in the future.

Birds flying over treetops in a forest against a hazy sky

Rabbi Joshua Boettiger shares the links between a Jewish ethical tradition and creative expression and how together they can help us find a path in the darkness.

Open book of poetry next to a glass jar of flowers

A computer scientist shares how the study of Talmud and Zohar informed his understanding of A.I. and how Jewish ethics can guide society’s response to rapidly evolving technology.

Listen: ChatGPT, Artificial Intelligence & Jewish Ethics

In this powerful poem, Rabbi Annie Lewis invokes the ancient call for help, Hoshia Na, in the name of those killed, wounded and captured on October 7, Simchat Torah.

Gates of heaven opening

The Reconstructionist Network